Sitemap | Contact Us  

Welcome To Taj Pharmaceuticals Ltd API      

About Worldwide  |     FAQs    |    Careers     | |        Media Center  |  |    Taj Pharmaceuticals  World   | |     TAJ Group 


       2004 - 2009 Taj Pharmaceuticals Limited . All rights reserved

trees thoughts and innovation

      India              Latin America/ Caribbean            Africa & Middle East              Asia              Russia              Europe  

Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients  TAJ PHARMACEUTICALS LIMITED
   
 
   PRODUCT LIST
   Home
   API >>
   Pharmaceuticals API List >>>
   Chemicals
   Manufacturing
   Product Development
   Product Search
   Agro Chemicals
   Custom Pharma Services
   Contact Us
 

 
Caffeine Home

 





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 



taj group

 
                                                                                                                              
Caffeine History

caffeine CAS 58--8-2

Cas No. [58-08-2]


Humans have consumed caffeine since the Stone Age. Early peoples found that chewing the seeds, bark, or leaves of certain plants had the effects of easing fatigue, stimulating awareness, and elevating one's mood. Only much later was it found that the effect of caffeine was increased by steeping such plants in hot water. Many cultures have legends that attribute the discovery of such plants to people living many thousands of years ago.
According to one popular Chinese legend, the Emperor of China Shennong, reputed to have reigned in about 3000 BC, accidentally discovered that when some leaves fell into boiling water, a fragrant and restorative drink resulted. Shennong is also mentioned in Lu Yu's Cha Jing, a famous early work on the subject of tea. The history of coffee has been recorded as far back as the ninth century. During that time, coffee beans were available only in their native habitat, Ethiopia. A popular legend traces its discovery to a goatherder named Kaldi, who apparently observed goats that became elated and sleepless at night after grazing on coffee shrubs and, upon trying the berries that the goats had been eating, experienced the same vitality. The earliest literary mention of coffee may be a reference to Bunchum in the works of the 9th century Persian physician al-Razi. In 1587, Malaye Jaziri compiled a work tracing the history and legal controversies of coffee, entitled "Undat al safwa fi hill al-qahwa". In this work, Jaziri recorded that one Sheikh, Jamal-al-Din al-Dhabhani, mufti of Aden, was the first to adopt the use of coffee in 1454, and that in the 15th century the Sufis of Yemen routinely used coffee to stay awake during prayers.
Towards the close of the 16th century, the use of coffee was recorded by a European resident in Egypt, and about this time it came into general use in the Near East. The appreciation of coffee as a beverage in Europe, where it was first known as "Arabiancaffeine home wine," dates from the 17th century. A legend states that after the Ottoman Turks retreated from the walls of Vienna after losing a battle for the city, many sacks of coffee beans were found among their baggage. Europeans didn't know what to do with all the coffee beans, being unfamiliar with them. So Franz George Kolschitzky, a Pole who had actually worked for the Turks, offered to take them. He subsequently taught the Viennese how to make coffee, and the first coffee house in the Western world was opened in Vienna, thus starting a long tradition of coffee appreciation. In Britain, the first coffee houses were opened in London in 1652, at St Michael's Alley, Cornhill. They soon became popular throughout Western Europe, and played a significant role in social relations in the 17th and 18th centuries.
The kola nut, like the coffee berry and tea leaf, appears to have ancient origins. It is chewed in many West African cultures, individually or in a social setting, to restore vitality and ease hunger pangs. In 1911, kola became the focus of one of the earliest documented health scares when the US government seized 40 barrels and 20 kegs of Coca-Cola syrup in Chattanooga, Tennessee, alleging that the caffeine in its drink was "injurious to health". On March 13, 1911, the government initiated The United States v. Forty Barrels and Twenty Kegs of Coca-Cola, hoping to force Coca-Cola to remove caffeine from its formula by making claims, such as that the excessive use of Coca-Cola at one girls' school led to "wild nocturnal freaks, violations of college rules and female proprieties, and even immoralities." Although the judge ruled in favor of Coca-Cola, two bills were introduced to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1912 to amend the Pure Food and Drug Act, adding caffeine to the list of "habit-forming" and "deleterious" substances which must be listed on a product's label.
The earliest evidence of cocoa use comes from residue found in an ancient Mayan pot dated to 600 BC. In the New World, chocolate was consumed in a bitter and spicy drink called xocoatl, often seasoned with vanilla, chile pepper, and achiote. Xocoatl was believed to fight fatigue, a belief that is probably attributable to the theobromine and caffeine content. Chocolate was an important luxury good throughout pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, and cocoa beans were often used as currency.
Xocoatl was introduced to Europe by the Spaniards and became a popular beverage by 1700. They also introduced the cacao tree into the West Indies and the Philippines. It was used in alchemical processes, where it was known as Black Bean.
The leaves and stems of the Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria) were used by Native Americans to brew a tea called Asi or the Black Drink the use of which among Native American groups archaeologists have demonstrated to stretch back far into antiquity, possibly dating to Late Archaic times.
 



caffeine taj india


 

          text logo  
PDF DOWNLOAD WORD DOCUMENT  TEXT DOCUMENT   MSDS
                        

 

Product Enquiry Product Quotation Sample Request Place Your Order    
Product Enquiry Product Quotation Sample Request Place Your Order    

        
>>   New Product Introduced : Oseltamivir Phosphate, Phenyl Propanolamine, Phenylephrine, Etafedrine


Taj pharmaceuticals API Logo



 

     
    Occurrence    
    History >>    
    Synthesis and properties    
    Pharmacology    
    Metabolism and half-life    
    Mechanism of action    
    Effects when taken in moderation    
    Tolerance and withdrawal    
    Overuse    
    Caffeine intoxication    
    Anxiety and sleep disorders    
    Effects on memory and learning    
    Effects on the heart    
    Effects on children    
    Caffeine intake during pregnancy    
    Decaffeination    
     

caffeine
 

We all know that one of the most powerful chemical compounds found in both coffee and tea is caffeine. Has caffeine become an important part of your daily life? Did you know
Article : What Is Caffeine?

Caffeine is a drug that is naturally produced in the leaves and seeds of many plants. It's also produced artificially and added to certain foods. Caffeine is defined as a drug because it stimulates the central nervous system, causing increased alertness. Caffeine gives most people a temporary energy boost and elevates mood.
Caffeine is in tea, coffee, chocolate, many soft drinks, and pain relievers and other over-the-counter medications. In its natural form, caffeine tastes very bitter. But most caffeinated drinks have gone through enough processing to camouflage the bitter taste.
Teens usually get most of their caffeine from soft drinks and energy drinks. (In addition to caffeine, these also can have added sugar and artificial flavors.) Caffeine is not stored in the body, but you may feel its effects for up to 6 hours.
 


Caffeine Cas No. [58-08-2]

TAj Chemical and Pharma Industry
Copyright Taj Pharmaceuticals Ltd. | Privacy Policy | Terms & Conditions |
Sitemap

      Investor Relations    Feedback     Contact Worldwide    Sitemap
 

taj group logo
2004 - 2009 Taj Pharmaceuticals Limited . All rights reserved
Note:-We are committed to helping you find the right answers to your questions and concerns. However, this web site is not intended to give investment advice, promote the use of Taj Pharmaceuticals  Ltd products or provide information on which to base medical treatment. If you have questions regarding any Taj Pharmaceuticals  Ltd product or are experiencing a medical emergency, please consult your health care provider.
Additionally, contact information on this web site cannot be used to report adverse drug events. If you are a physician, please follow the procedures required by your country's regulations. Please choose one of the given options to contact us and we will respond to your inquiry as quickly as possible.